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IT IS ALL SOLAR

MEGALITH STUDYCeltic Cross Mystery

DisclTHE FORUMaimer

 


PROOF THAT

PHILIPPE DE CHERISEY

COULD NOT HAVE WRITTEN THE SHEPHERDESS PARCHMENT

 

Above shows a picture of Jean-Luc-Chaumeil holding up what he alleges is Pierre Plantard's confession that Philippe de Cherisey was the author. This was shown in the TV programme 'History of a Mystery. The first anomaly to point out is that the two pieces of paper are clearly different and that the bottom parchment (The Dagobert Parchment) has the word 'Photocopie' clearly written by Pierre Plantard. Shown below:

If this bottom document is a photocopy where is the original?

  1. Philippe de Cherisey NEVER confessed publicly to writing the parchments or as far we know to the writers of 'Holy Blood and the Holy Grail' and the 'The Messianic Legacy'. Although in The Messianic Legacy the authors do say that they had heard that the parchment had been faked, they give a large treatise as to why they think this may not be correct.

    But for now we only have this allegation of de Chèrisey's authorship from Jean Luc Chaumeil AFTER de Chèrisey's sudden death. This apparant admission by de Cherisey comes from a document which Chaumeil calls 'Stone and Paper'. Chaumeil still refuses to have this Stone and Paper document scrutinised by independent experts.

    Whilst this Stone and Paper is de Chèrisey's handwriting it is most likely the paper referred to on page 154 of 'The Key to the Sacred Pattern' written by Henry Lincoln.

    Extract from 'The Key to the Sacred Pattern by Henry Lincoln describing a meeting with Philippe de Cherisey. (pp154)

    QUOTE

    'I'm writing an explanation of the codes. I'll send you a copy. You'll be amused' But I am never to see it. 1 Nor am I ever to get any closer to the 'parchment originals'. Sadly Philippe de Cherisey died suddenly in July 1985. 

    1 There is reason to suspect that this document may have been part of the haul of stolen Priory papers' which figured in the Chaumeil imbroglio"

    END OF QUOTE

    willingly from Philippe de Cherisey.

Here we have several passages from Philippe de Chèrisey's book CIRCUIT were we find him reaching for an answer.

  •  "The presence of Teniers in the message indicates a path to follow from the church of RLC to the church of Saint-Luc, a village further north. This is inferred from two anecdotes concerning the painter, the robe of his procurator, his trade association. Teniers' last painting shows a procurator wearing a black robe. When asked about his health, the ageing Teniers said he had burnt his last tooth to get the ivory black of the robe. In his youth, Teniers held the position of master of St Luke's brotherhood in Antwerp, which gathered all painters.

     



Here we have a man clearly reaching for an answer. If he was supposedly the author he would not need to reach.

Here is the proof of Philippe de Chèrisey's innocence of being the author on two points.

Here is the relevant parchment with the extraneous letter highlighted:

parchment 1

The passage shows a passage of Latin written in Greek Uncial style writing. Incidentally this text appeared in the public domain in 1889 this does not mean it was created at that time and a copy of it may have been around in Leiden in 1633.

What is immediately obvious is that this writing carries extraneous lettering not found in the Latin text (these roughly occur every seventh letter but there are exceptions to this rule). The passage depicts  a passage from the gospel of John chapter 12 verses 1 to 11 where it talks about the incident depicted on a stained glass window inside the sacristy of Rennes le Chateau church where Mary Magdalene anoints the feet of Jesus:

Iesus ergo ante sex dies Pashae uenit Bethanam, ubi fuerat Lazarus mortuus, quem suscitauit Iesus. Fecerunt autemei caenam ibi: et Martha ministrabat, Lazarus uero unus erat ex discumbentibus cum eo. Maria ergo acceptit libram ungenti nardi pistici, pretiosi, et unxit pedes Iesu, et extersit capilillis suis pedes eius : et domus impleta est ex odore ungenti. Dicit ergo unus ex discipulis eius, Iudas Scariotus, qui erat eum traditurus : Quare hoc ungentum non ueniit trecentis denariis, et datum est egenis? Dixit autem hoc, non quia de egenis pertinebat ad eum sed quia fur erat, et loculos habens, ea quae mittebantur portabat. Dixit ergo Iesus: Sine illam ut in diem sepulturae meae seruet illud. Pauperes enim semper habetis nobiscum: me autem non semper habetis. Cognouit ergo turba multa ex Iudaeis quia illic est: et uenerunt, non propter Iesum tantum, sed ut Lazarum uiderent, quem suscitauit a mortis. Cogitauerunt autem principes sacerdotum ut et Lazarum interficerent: quia multi propter illum abibant ex Iudaeis, etcredebant in Iesum.

John 12:1-11 (K J V)

 1 Then Jesus six days before the Passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, which had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

 2 There they made him a supper; and Martha served: but Lazarus was one of them that sat at the table with him.

 3 Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment.

 4 Then saith one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, which should betray him,

 5 Why was not this ointment sold for three hundred pence, and given to the poor?

 6 This he said, not that he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief, and had the bag, and bare what was put therein.

 7 Then said Jesus, Let her alone: against the day of my burying hath she kept this.

 8 For the poor always ye have with you; but me ye have not always.

 9 Much people of the Jews therefore knew that he was there: and they came not for Jesus' sake only, but that they might see Lazarus also, whom he had raised from the dead.

 10 But the chief priests consulted that they might put Lazarus also to death;

 11 Because that by reason of him many of the Jews went away, and believed on Jesus.

 

The curious drawing appears on the bottom right of the parchment:

Then

JÉSU . MEDÈLA . VULNÉRUM + SPES . UNA . PŒNITENTIUM

PER . MAGDALÀNÆ . LACRYMAS + PECCATA . NOSTRA . DILUAS

The untidy mark in the middle of  N Q I Ѕ is almost certainly a crude drawing of this rugged cross depicted in the bas-relief .

On the left is Noel Corbu pictured pre 1970 showing the bas relief of Mary Magdalene underneath the altar and a repetition of the phrase from the bottom of the parchment that was later destroyed by a vandal.

This shows that the author of the parchment was aware of this phrase prior to 1970. Also it shows that as this bas-relief was done by Saunière the parchment in it's present form could not have been made prior to his renovation of the church. Therefore unless this phrase on the parchment was borrowed from a previous display the parchment is unlikely to have been around in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The phrase is bad Latin the phrase:


"Jesus, you remedy against our pains and only hope for our repentance, it is thanks to Magdalene's tears that you wash our sins away."

Is probably the best guess. 

 

However for this to be correct the Latin should be:

 JESU VULNERUM MEDELA + PAENITENTIUM UNA SPES

MAGDALENAE LACRYMAS + PECCATA NOSTRA DILUAS

 

Sauniere was an accomplished reader of Latin and it therefore becomes intriguing as to why he should make such a very obvious error right underneath the altar and additionally intriguing as to why the same mistake was made on the parchment.

These extraneous letters found in the text, 140 of them, form a complex code. These letters are depicted below (this is a copy from the book 'The Holy Place' by Henry Lincoln.) This in turn was taken directly from the book written by Gérard de Sède called 'Le Tresor Maudit'.

 

V  C  P  S  J  Q  R  O

V  Y  M  Y  Y  D  L  T

P  o  h R  B  O  X  T

O  D  J  L  B  K  N  J

F  Q  U  E  P  A  J  Y

N  P  P  B  F  E  I  E

L  R  G  H  I  I  R  Y

B  T  T  C  V  x  G  D

A  D  G  E  N  E  S  A  R  E  T  H

L  U  C  C V  M  T  E

J  H  P  N  P  G  S  V

Q  J  H  G  M  L  F  T

S  V  J  L  Z  Q  M  T

O  X  A  N  P  E  M  U

P  H  K  O  R  P  K  H

V  J  C  M  C  A  T  L

V  Q  X  G  G  N  D  T

 

The first thing of interest is AD GENESARETH in plain text in the middle 12 letters and these are firstly removed. It means 'Towards Galilee'. Interestingly this piece of paper (shown below) was left in a book once owned by the Abbe Bigou, former cure of Rennes le Chateau who is believed by some to be the author of the parchments.

It says:

This is very old French and the translation may not entirely be correct.

The beginning of .....US is missing and is open to speculation.

You can see the name Bigou on the original page to which this piece of paper is now stuck on the right about two thirds the way down.

 Philippe de Chèrisey does not mention AD GENESARETH in his so-called confession as to why this is included nor indeed does he mention that it is included at all. Curious that he should confess to making the parchment but not explain the meaning of this nor indeed even acknowledge that it is there.

The extraneous letters written in small type are supposed errors made by the author and corrected by Gérard de Sède. It is clear that de Sède did not understand how the code was made but was only given a crude method of decryption by persons unknown. The code does not need to be corrected and the original author did NOT make a mistake. For Gérard de Sède used a 26 letter alphabet (presumably told to do so by Philippe de Chèrisey for his decryption who got it wrong too) whilst the original author had used a 25 letter alphabet for encryption. The French did not adopt a 26 letter alphabet until about 150 years ago indicating the possibility that the original author wrote the code more than 150 years ago.

When the 12 letters in the centre are removed and it leaves 128 letters and these are arranged into two groups of 64 letters. Then the Tableau de Vigenère Code is applied. The method is shown here.

A very good treatise on this by Steve Mizrath is shown here

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

  V     C   P    S    J    Q    R   O

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

V    Y    M    Y    Y    D    L    T

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

P     o     h     R    B    O    X   T

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

O    D    J    L    B    K    N    J

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

F    Q    U    E    P    A    J    Y

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

N    P    P    B    F    E    I    E

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

L    R    G    H    I    I    R    Y

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

B    T    T    C    V    x    G    D

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

L    U    C    C   V    M    T    E

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

J    H    P    N    P    G    S    V

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

Q    J    H    G    M    L    F    T

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

S    V    J    L    Z    Q    M    T

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

O    X    A    N    P    E    M    U

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

P    H    K    O    R    P    K    H

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

V    J    C    M    C    A    T    L

M   o    r    t   e    p    e   e

V    Q    X    G    G    N    D    T

 

Using the key and the  Tableau de Vigenère the first letter V is therefore cross referenced to the letter M of MORTEPEE and is therefore changed to the letter I and so on.

The result (according to Gérard de Sède that is who apparently got this method direct from Philippe de Chèrisey) is:

I  Q  H  M  N  G  V  S  I  M  E  R  C  S  P  Y

C  S  X  L  F  E  B  Y  B  R  B  F  F  A  R  N

R  F  M  Y  T  P  N  C  A  E  H  U  J  T  M  I

Y  G  Y  B  M  Y  V  C  N  I  L  V  A  J  K  H

Y  J  T  V  A  C  Y  I  V  V  H  H  T  V  X  A

D  Y  Z  A  Q  B  J  Y  F  K  B  F  D  G  Q  Y

B  L  R  H  T  T  Q  Z  C  V  C  I  V  F  O  L

I  Y  T  G  G  P  Y  P  I  F  O  A  K  D  H  Y

 

    The next stage is to substitute the letter with the letter that follows it in the alphabet so that A becomes B, B becomes C etc. This leaves:

J  R  I  N  O  H  X  T  J  N  F  S  D  T  Q  Z

D  T  Y  M  G  F  C  Z  C  S  C  G  G  B  S  O

S  G  N  Z  U  Q  O  D  B  F  I  V  K  U  N  J

Z  H  Z  C  N  Z  X  D  O  J  M  X  B  K  L  I

Z  K  U  X  B  D  Z  J  X  X  I  I  U  X  Y  B

E  Z  A  B  R  C  K  Z  G  L  C  G  E  H  R  Z

C  M  S  I  U  U  R  A  D  X  D  J  X  G  P  M

J  Z  U  H  H  Q  Z  Q  J  G  P  B  L  E  I  Z

The next stage the Tableau de Vigenère Code is applied once again only this time using the entire headstone text:

To make up the prerequisite 128 letters the phrase PS PRAECUM is added this and this can be found on the other tombstone which contains the phrase ET IN ARCADIA EGO written in Greek lettering:

 

However something incredible happens here because it has been found that the phrase on the tomb is a direct anagram of the final result with PS PRAECUM removed.

This new key is applied to the Tableau de Vigenère only the tombstone text + PS PRAECUM is this time applied reversed and the result is:

V  M  K  R  O  Z  M  M  Z  R  H  S  S  H  Z  S

D  V  Q  Q  O  A  S  D  T  B  Z  D  D  M  H  Q

V  S  F  D  D  M  C  D  K  N  Q  R  H  Z  Z  N

D  K  D  E  R  C  P  Q  O  D  C  B  T  O  F  V

Z  H  D  L  T  H  C  N  B  D  I  C  M  L  D  F

L  B  N  B  D  D  O  C  R  G  Q  V  Z  H  Z  C

G  Z  S  L  N  Z  D  R  D  A  H  B  D  K  D  Q

M  D  D  Z  H  D  D  C  K  U  D  T   K  C  B

Stage 4 is like stage 2 except the letter is shifted down the alphabet. Gérard de Sède's original 26 letter alphabet version necessitated a two-letter shift at this stage to make it work clearly confirming that these supposed authors of the text didn't know how to decrypt what was apparently their own creation.

The result is as follows:

X  N  L  S  P  A  N  N  A  S  I  T  T  I  A  T

E  X  R  R  P  B  T  E  U  C  A  E  E  N  I  R

X  T  G  E  E  N  D  E  L  O  R  S  I  A  A  O

E  L  E  F  S  D  Q  R  P  E  D  C  U  P  G  X

A  I  E  M  U  I  D  O  C  E  J  D  N  M  E  G

M  C  O  C  E  E  P  D  S  H  R  X  A  I  A  D

H  A  T  M  O  A  E  S  E  B  I  C  E  L  E  R

N  E  E  A  I  E  E  D  L  V  E  V  U  L  D  C

 The next stage a very clever and elaborate encoding technique is applied. The 128 letters of the text are divided up into two blocks of 8 x 8 squares

X N L S P A N N
A S I T T I A T
E X R R P B T E
U C A E E N I R
X T G E E N D E
L O R S I A A O
E L E F S D Q R
P E D C U P G X
A I E M U I D O
C E J D N M E G
M C O C E E P D
S H R X A I A D
H A T M O A E S
E B I C E L E R
N E E A I E E D
L V E V U L D C

This then uses a technique called the 'Knight's Tour' which makes the knight touch each and every square only once taking with it the letter on that square to square it moves to.

-e5-d3-c5-e4-c3--d5-e3-c4-d6-c8

-b5-a3-b1-d2-f1-h2-g4-h6-g7-e8-c7

-b6-a4-b2-d1-f2-h1-g3-h5-f4-e6-d4-c6

e7-g8--e1-g2-f4-h3-g5-h7-f8-d7-b8-a6

b4-a2-c1-d3-c5-e6-d4-c6-e5-c4-d6-e4-f6

BERGERE PAS DE TENTATION QUE POUSSIN TENIERS GARDENT LA CLEF PAX DCLXXXI PAR

Then the second 64 in reverse starting at square 46

f6-e4-d6-c4-e5-c6-d4-e6-c5-d3-c1-a2-b4

a6-b8-d7-f8-h7-g5-h3-f4-g2-e1-c2-a1-b3

a5-b7-d8-fy-h8-g6-h4-f5-e3-d5-c3-e2-g1

f3-h2-g4-h6-g8-e7-c8-a7-b5-a3-b1-d2-f1

g3-h1-f2-d1-b2-a4-b6-a8-c7-e8-g7-h5 

 Yields

LA CROIX ET CE CHEVAL DE DIEU J ACHEVE CE DAEMON DE GARDIEN A MIDI POMMES BLEUES

The reader is reminded that after this incredible process the final result is an anagram of the Hautpoul tombstone plus the phrase PS PRAECUM.

The chances of this occurring by accident are greater than a billion to one.

De Cherisey does allude to this fact in the document held by Jean Luc Chaumeil called Stone and Paper. He says:

"wouldn't it be prodigious if, at the end of all this work, we could but reconstitute the funerary text? Prodigious and perfectly stupid... May our reader rest assured: another text is to be discovered and ."

"Common opinion has it that , parish priest of RLC in 1781 and , also composed this amusement. Such is not our opinion:

and includes a signature which we shall discover when analysing the decoded text."

De Cherisey does NOT admit he composed it here, indeed he says it is an opinion. How can it be merely an opinion if he was the author?

Here de Chèrisey says quite clearly that he is the author of the SOLUTION to the code. i.e. BERGERE PAS DE TENTATION quoted on pages 20.21 of his book. The lawyer agrees that de Chérisey's SOLUTION shouldn't be used by another author (in this case Gerard de Sède). This in no way represents de Chérisey admitting to writing the original code.

DE CHÉRISEY DOES NOT SAY HE IS THE AUTHOR OF THE ORIGINAL CODE

ONLY ITS SOLUTION

An overemphasis methinks.

Please be aware of this slight of hand used by the detractors.

  • Additional Evidence

    A new piece of evidence has come to light regarding the Hautpoul Tombstone in the form of a document (cover shown right) dating from 1906.

    In 1905 a member of the Société d'études scientifiques de l'Aude' (Scientific Research Society of the Aude), produced in their volume XVII in the year 1906 an account of a visit by Monsieur Elie TISSEYRE to Rennes le Chateau and Rennes les Bains. The visit took place on the 25th June 1905.

    In the document Tisseyre describes in very fine detail his visits to the area and his visit to Saunière's Church and gardens the point of interest here is translated here below.

     

      The Church (1740) [St Mary Madeleine, Rennes le Chateau] soon loomed ahead of us. The interior was superb, with attractive paintings exuding freshness and charm. We looked for some signs of the past there, but in vain. But in a small garden adjoining the church one of us recognised a crudely sculpted (or rather engraved) tombstone as dating from the 5th century; it was unfortunate that this tombstone was being used as a step of a staircase and was therefore exposed to all the inclemencies[sic] of the open air. It would have been better if it had been placed inside the church where it could with advantage have taken the place of some varnished or gilded panel or other.

      We also noted, in another small garden, a stone plinth supporting a statue of the Virgin. This plinth, very old and of beautiful workmanship, had been retouched on the pretext of giving it a higher relief: on the contrary, in doing so the workman had deprived it of any trace of artistry and had destroyed the preciousness of this ancient piece of sculpture.

      A visit to the cemetery enabled us to discover, in a corner, a wide tombstone, broken in the middle, on which one could read a very crudely engraved inscription.

      This tombstone measured 1.30 metres by 0.65 metres.

      ‘Here lies the noble Marie de Nègre D’Arles, La Dame d’Hautpoul de Blanchefort, aged sixty-seven, died 17 January 1781, May she rest in peace’

    But then someone came to remind us that it was time for lunch, which was served in one of the rooms of the Castle. The meal was certainly of the better standard. An excellent mocha rounded off the festivities and the first part of our programme. We thanked M. Auguste Fons for his hospitality and, at the suggestion of M. Fages, elected him a member of the Society to a round of applause

     

On the right is a reproduction of Eugene Stüblein's drawing of a tombstone in his book Pierre Gravées du Languedoc. Notice that the drawing has a crack down the middle and Stüblein's signature is in the bottom right hand corner. Notice that the tombstone spells what should be 'd'Ables' - d'Arles and the dimensions are the same as the defaced tombstone currently in the Rennes le Chateau museum. This shows that the Hautpoul tombstone was around in 1905 and as the inscription is a direct anagram of the final 'Bergere pas de tentation........' message. Then it shows that the parchment is unlikely to have been made in the 1960s.  

The Stüblein Family Grave is at Alet Les Bains.